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A Quick Reminder About Twitter Functionality from Skiing Magazine’s HR Department

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GREGG
BLANCHARD
   

The other day I saw this.

skiingmag

Aside from the account manager who seemed to copy/paste the URL of the Bitly confirmation page instead of the link itself, the rapid-fire, everyone-sees-everything approach did not go unnoticed.

As you might have guessed, snark ensued:

But then, just a few hours later on that same fateful day, I saw this:

flagstaff

There is a ton of turnover in resort marketing departments right now as the job board rather clearly indicates, so let’s review a simple piece of the Twitter platform in case these duties have fallen to someone else in the interim.

Who Sees What
In both cases, the account was tagged in the middle of the tweet. By so doing, all of the followers of the tweeter would see that content.

If, however, the account was tagged at the very beginning of a tweet, only the followers of that tweet who also follow the account that is being tagged would see that “reply” (well, at least that’s how Twitter would likely refer to it).

For example, ALL of Ski Flagstaff’s follower’s could see this:

But ONLY people who follow both Anna Banana AND Mr Timberlake would see this:

In the first case, a bunch of celebs ignore your tweets while your followers get a feed full of repetitious, spam-like posts.

In the second case, a bunch of celebs still ignore your tweets but at least only the occasional follower who also follows the person you are tweeting at sees the tweet.

Capiche?

One Last Note
Now, personally, I probably wouldn’t take that approach from a brand account.

I’m not one to shy away from experimenting with borderline-spammy techniques (as a half-dozen account suspensions can attest), but that should be done from a personal or sandbox account, not the brand account.

Carry on.


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